Blog

A lot has been said about Cancer Research UK’s new campaign. The posters, seen across the UK in bus stops and high streets show what initially appears to be a cigarette packet carrying the message ‘Obesity is a cause of cancer too.’

(Credit: Anomaly London)

Some have argued that the message is clumsy and unhelpful. The implication that people are as in control of their weight, as they are of their smoking habits is damaging. Fat shaming, even.

Others counter this with the fact that our body shape and size is around 70% inheritable. We are pretty much governed by our genes. Thanks mum and dad.

Whatever you think of the campaign, you can’t deny it has a visual impact and that it has stirred debate. I was reminded of a great print ad which was done a couple of years ago by Saatchi Sri Lanka, for the Diabetes Association.

The message was similar in that it was coming at you from a surprising place. The copy here is brilliantly executed and you just have to read it. Words and visuals in perfect harmony.

(Credit: Saatchi Sri Lanka)

In case your eyes are as bad as mine, here’s the copy:

Tobacco is highly addictive. You love the way it makes you feel, the satisfaction it gives. You crave it. You need it to get through the day. It stimulates an integral part of your brain. It silently narrows your blood vessels, leading to more complications like heart disease and stroke. Somewhere in the world, it takes a life every 6 seconds.

Sugar is highly addictive. You love the way it makes you feel, the satisfaction it gives. You crave it. You need it to get through the day. It stimulates an integral part of your brain. It silently narrows your blood vessels, leading to more complications like heart disease and stroke. Somewhere in the world, it takes a life every 6 seconds.

I once gave up sugar a few years ago for two weeks, almost as an experiment to see what the impact was. When you realise that sugar is in just about everything we eat, you see what a challenging thing it is to do. Once I’d got through the withdrawal symptoms and headaches it was easier. I definitely have less sugar now – and am particularly proud to say that I’ve not touched a fizzy drink in years.

Just don’t ask me to give up coffee.

Author:Alex Hinge

Job Title: Creative Copywriter